• Users Online: 511
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page


 
 Table of Contents  
RESEARCH ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 1003-1008

Nerve autografts and tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries: a 5-year bibliometric analysis


1 Department of Orthopedics, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, China
2 Department of Nursing, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, China
3 Clinic Division, Department of Surgery, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, China

Date of Acceptance04-Feb-2015
Date of Web Publication29-Jun-2015

Correspondence Address:
Hong-ying Pi
Department of Nursing, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing
China
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1673-5374.158369

Rights and Permissions
  Abstract 

With advances in biomedical methods, tissue-engineered materials have developed rapidly as an alternative to nerve autografts for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries. However, the materials selected for use in the repair of peripheral nerve injuries, in particular multiple injuries and large-gap defects, must be chosen carefully. Various methods and materials for protecting the healthy tissue and repairing peripheral nerve injuries have been described, and each method or material has advantages and disadvantages. Recently, a large amount of research has been focused on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries. Using the keywords "pe­ripheral nerve injury", "autotransplant", "nerve graft", and "biomaterial", we retrieved publications using tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries appearing in the Web of Science from 2010 to 2014. The country with the most total publications was the USA. The institutions that were the most productive in this field include Hannover Medical School (Germany), Washington University (USA), and Nantong University (China). The total number of publications using tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries grad­ually increased over time, as did the number of Chinese publications, suggesting that China has made many scientific contributions to this field of research.

Keywords: nerve regeneration; peripheral nerve; nerve autograft; nerve transplantation; biomaterial; tissue engineering; neural regeneration


How to cite this article:
Gao Y, Wang Yl, Kong D, Qu B, Su Xj, Li H, Pi Hy. Nerve autografts and tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries: a 5-year bibliometric analysis. Neural Regen Res 2015;10:1003-8

How to cite this URL:
Gao Y, Wang Yl, Kong D, Qu B, Su Xj, Li H, Pi Hy. Nerve autografts and tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries: a 5-year bibliometric analysis. Neural Regen Res [serial online] 2015 [cited 2019 Nov 20];10:1003-8. Available from: http://www.nrronline.org/text.asp?2015/10/6/1003/158369

Yuan Gao#, Yu-ling Wang#
# These authors contributed equally to this work.
Author contributions: YG, YLW and HYP conceived and designed the paper. YG and YLW wrote the paper. YG, YLW, DK, BQ, XJS and HL colloected and analyzed the data. HYP provided critical revisions. All authors approved the final version of the paper.



  Introduction Top


Peripheral nerve injuries can cause severe sensory loss or secondary injuries to the peripheral nerve tissues, making them one of the most pressing problems in the fields of traumatic surgery and microsurgery. Satisfactory treatments for these problems are lacking. After a peripheral nerve injury occurs, the injection of nerve growth factors can promote nerve regeneration. However, this approach is ineffective for large-gap peripheral nerve defects, making nerve transplants necessary for the timely repair of such peripheral nerve injuries (Lundborg et al., 1997; Matsumoto et al., 2000). Tissue engineering methods provide new techniques for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries because tissue-engineered materials can reduce the risk of fibrosis and desmoplasia, promote and guide axon growth, and bridge nerve defects after peripheral nerve injury (Heath et al., 1998; Kim et al., 2008). Among the various methods for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries, the research and clinical application of nerve autografts and tissue-engineered materials has been increasing. Nerve autografts are considered the gold standard for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries in the clinic because they pose little risk of immunological rejection (Rinker et al., 2014). However, their clinical application is restricted by the limited tissue supply. In contrast, tissue-engineered materials can be made from a wide range of sources. In the present study, we used bibliometric analysis methods to determine the advantages and disadvantages of nerve autografts and tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries.


  Data and Methodology Top


We searched the Web of Science database provided by Thomson Reuters for publications in English regarding nerve autografts and tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries from January 2010 to December 2014 using the key words "peripheral nerve injury", "autotransplant", "nerve graft", and "biomaterial". A total of 1,036 publications on nerve autografts and 472 publications on tissue-engineered materials were retrieved.

The inclusion criteria were publications on: (1) nerve allografts for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries; (2) nerve autografts for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries; (3) tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries; and (4) topics closely associated with nerve autografts or tissue-engineered materials.

The exclusion criteria were repeated studies and meta-analysis papers.

Using the SCI database and Excel software, the extracted records were statistically analyzed for their country of origin, research area, institution, publication year, type of publication (including original research articles, reviews, meeting abstracts, proceedings papers, book chapters, and editorial material), and publication journal.


  Results Top


Therapeutic effects of different graft materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries

Nerve transplants used for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries include nerve autografts, nerve allografts, and tissue-engineered materials (Bădoiu et al., 2014). These different grafts have their own advantages and disadvantages ([Table 1]).
Table 1 Advantages and disadvantages of nerve grafts for the repair of peripheral nerve injury

Click here to view


Nerve autografts are generally isolated from autologous tissues, such as small nerves, vessels, and muscle. Replacing injured peripheral nerves with nerve autografts is currently considered the gold standard for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries because they minimize immunological reactions and provide a suitable microenvironment for nerve regeneration, which promotes a therapeutic effect (Radtke et al., 2014). Still, nerve autografts have many limitations. For example, although vein has some advantages for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries including inertia, degradation resistance, and a low cost, the donor-site complications should be considered (Tom et al., 2011; Leuzzi et al., 2014). Free fat is an abundant source material, but its therapeutic effects on the repair of peripheral nerve injuries remains uncertain. In addition, the kinetics of fat tissue reabsorption are not clearly defined. Gastrocolic omentum can also be used to repair large areas of injured peripheral nerve because it contains neurotrophic factors and pro-angiogenic factors. However, the main disadvantage of this method is that the gastrocolic omentum flap must be harvested through a laparoscopic operation, which increases the risk of injury (Hernández-Cortés et al., 2014; Sivak et al., 2014). To address these problems, research has focused on nerve autografts and tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries.

Bibliometric analysis of publications on nerve autografts for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries from 2010 to 2014 indexed in the Web of Science

Distribution of publications by year

The total number of publications on nerve autografts for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries from 2010 to 2014 indexed in the Web of Science showed a slight, but not significant, increase over time. A total of 1,036 publications were retrieved, including 180 in 2010, 229 in 2011, 200 in 2012, 203 in 2013, and 224 in 2014, indicating that 2011 was the most productive year ([Figure 1]).
Figure 1 Number of publications on nerve autograft for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries from 2010 to 2014 in the Web of Science.

Click here to view


Distribution of publications by country

The countries that published articles on nerve autografts for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries from 2010 to 2014 in the Web of Science are shown in [Table 2].
Table 2 Top ten countries that published articles on nerve autografts for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries from 2010 to 2014 in the Web of Science

Click here to view


A total of 1,036 publications on nerve autografts for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries from 2010 to 2014 were retrieved from the Web of Science. The country with the largest total number of publications on this topic was the USA (n = 304, 29.344%), followed by China (n = 219), Germany (n = 90), Japan (n = 76), Italy (n = 52), Iran (n =48), England (n = 48), Canada (n = 43), South Korea (n = 37), then Sweden (n = 34). Three Asian countries are included among the top countries publishing articles on this topic, suggesting that these Asian countries have made significant contributions to the use of nerve autografts for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries.

Distribution of publications by institution

Among the top 10 institutions publishing articles on nerve autografts for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries from 2010 to 2014 indexed in the Web of Science, the institution producing the most publications was Hannover Medical School (Germany) with 29 publications (2.799%), followed by the University of Washington (USA; n = 26), Urmia University (Iran; n = 21), Nantong University (China; n = 21), University of Saskatchewan (Canada; n = 20), University of Manchester (England; n = 20), Islamic Azad University (Iran; n = 19), Miami University (USA; n = 18), University of Turin (Italy; n = 17), then Umea University (Sweden; n = 17). Nantong University in China was ranked fourth ([Figure 2]).
Figure 2 The top 10 institutions publishing articles on nerve autografts for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries from 2010 to 2014 indexed in the Web of Science.
I: Hannover Medical School; II: University of Washington; III: Urmia University; IV: Nantong University; V: University of Saskatchewan; VI: University of Manchester; VII: Islamic Azad University; VIII: Miami University; IX: University of Turin; X: Umea University.


Click here to view


Distribution of publications by article type

Among the 1,036 publications on nerve autografts for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries from 2010 to 2014 indexed in the Web of Science, 882 (85.135%) were original research articles, 119 (11.486%) were reviews, 30 were meeting abstracts, 10 were editorial materials, and the remaining were other types. The original research articles clearly outnumbered the other publication types ([Table 3]).
Table 3 Types of publications on nerve autograft for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries from 2010 to 2014 indexed in the Web of Science

Click here to view


Distribution of publications by funding agency

The distribution of publications on nerve autografts for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries from 2010 to 2014 indexed in the Web of Science by funding agency is shown in [Table 4].
Table 4 The distribution of publications on nerve autografts for the repair of peripheral injuries from 2010 to 2014 indexed in the Web of Science by funding agency

Click here to view


Among the funding agencies that supported the research on nerve autografts for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries published from 2010 to 2014 and retrieved from the Web of Science, the largest number of publications was from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (n = 78, 7.529%), followed by National Institutes of Health (n = 59, 6.795%), High-Tech Research and Development Program of China (863 Program) (n = 15, 1.448%), then other agencies (n < 10).

Bibliometric analysis of publications on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries from 2010 to 2014 indexed in the Web of Science

Despite the rapid development of tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries, none of the investigated scaffold materials have performed better than nerve autografts. Scaffolds constructed from acellular nerve matrix or artificially synthesized degradable materials can be used to repair peripheral nerve injuries, but the addition of seed cells and neurotrophic factors is necessary to promote nerve regeneration (Beigi et al., 2014; Pateman et al., 2015). Assessment of the functional recovery of innervated muscles after the repair of peripheral nerve injuries is increasingly important. Therefore, there is an urgent need to determine the best repair material and graft construction protocol for achieving morphological and structural repair and functional recovery of injured peripheral nerves (Koudehi et al., 2014). The biomaterials often used for tissue engineering applications include artificially synthesized materials and modified natural materials, and they can be classified as either degradable or non-degradable. Ideal tissue-engineered materials should be histocompatible, non-toxic, promote cellular activity, and facilitate cell adhesion and growth (Ramburrun et al., 2014).

Distribution of publications by year

The total number of publications on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries from 2010 to 2014 indexed in the Web of Science significantly increased over time. A total of 472 publications were retrieved, including 68 (14.407) in 2010, 75 (15.89%) in 2011, 86 (18.22%) in 2012, 110 (23.305%) in 2013, and 133 (28.178%) in 2014 ([Figure 3]).
Figure 3 Number of publications on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries from 2010 to 2014 indexed in the Web of Science.

Click here to view


Distribution of publications by number of citations

Bibliometrics, first proposed by Alan Pritchard in 1969, uses quantitative and statistical methods, based on the classification of publications by individual features, to describe, evaluate, and predict the current status and developing trends in scientific techniques. Citation number has recently been considered a standard for classifying "classical publications". According to bibliometrics, a major criterion for measuring the quality of a publication is the number of citations, which is an important index for how peer reviewers evaluate the academic quality of an article. Higher citation rates indicate that an article has had a greater impact on subsequent research (Yue et al., 2008). The publications on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries indexed in the Web of Science from 2010 to 2014 with the most citations are shown in [Table 5].
Table 5 The most cited publications on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries from 2010 to 2014 indexed in the Web of Science

Click here to view


Distribution of publications by country

The countries that published articles on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries from 2010 to 2014 indexed in the Web of Science are shown in [Table 6].
Table 6 Top ten countries that published articles on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries indexed in the Web of Science from 2010 to 2014

Click here to view


A total of 472 publications on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries from 2010 to 2014 were retrieved from the Web of Science. The country with the largest total number of publications on this topic was the USA (n = 145, 30.72%), followed by China (n = 72), Italy (n = 44), Germany (n = 38), England (n = 36), Japan (n = 31), then other countries (n < 30). Three Asian countries are listed among the top countries publishing articles on this topic, suggesting that these Asian countries have made significant contributions to the use of tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries.

Distribution of publications by institution

The top 10 institutions publishing the largest number of articles on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries from 2010 to 2014 indexed in the Web of Science are shown in [Figure 4].
Figure 4 Top 10 institutions publishing the largest number of articles on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries from 2010 to 2014 indexed in the Web of Science.
I: Nantong University; II: University of Michigan; III: University Col­lege London; IV: University of Turin; V: Hannover Medical School; VI: Chinese Academy of Sciences; VII: Washington University; VIII: Tufts University; IX: Mayo Clinic; X: University of Milan.


Click here to view


Among the top 10 institutions publishing the largest number of articles on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries from 2010 to 2014 indexed in the Web of Science, the institution that published the largest number was Nantong University (China) with 16 publications (3.39%), followed by the University of Michigan (USA; n = 11), University College London (England; n = 11), University of Turin (Italy; n = 9), Hannover Medical School (Germany; n = 8), Chinese Academy of Sciences (China; n = 8), Washington University (USA: n = 7), Tufts University (USA; n = 7), Mayo Clinic (USA; n = 7), and University of Milan (Italy; n = 6). Nantong University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences were within the top 10 institutions publishing articles on this topic.

Distribution of publications by funding agency

The distribution of publications on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries from 2010 to 2014 indexed in the Web of Science by funding agency is shown in [Table 7].
Table 7 The distribution of publications on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral injuries from 2010 through 2014 indexed in the Web of Science by funding agency

Click here to view


Among the funding agencies that supported publications on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries from 2010 to 2014 retrieved from the Web of Science, the funding agency that supported the largest number of publications was the National Natural Science Foundation of China (n = 38, 8.051%), followed by the National Institutes of Health (n = 35, 7.416%), and then other agencies (n < 10). China has financially supported more published studies on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries than any other country.

Distribution of publications by journal

Among the journals publishing articles on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries from 2010 to 2014 retrieved from the Web of Science, the journal with the largest number of articles was Biomaterials with 28 publications (5.932%), followed by PLoS One (n = 24), the Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A (n = 14), Tissue engineering Part A (n = 7), Neural Regeneration Research (n = 6), Journal of Neural Engineering (n = 5), Biomed Research International (n = 5), and Neuroscience Letters (n = 4). These results will help scholars in this research field know which journals publish work on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries, increasing publication success rate and better disseminating the research findings. The journals that have published the largest number of articles on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries from 2010 to 2014 retrieved from the Web of Science are shown in [Table 8].
Table 8 The journals that have published the most articles on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries indexed in the Web of Science

Click here to view



  Discussion Top


The repair process for peripheral nerve injuries is complex, and functional recovery of the injured peripheral nerve can be inhibited by many factors, including the slow speed of nerve regeneration, limited availability of nerve autografts, and immunological rejection caused by nerve allografts (Alluin et al., 2006; Campbell, 2008). Interest and research in the use of tissue-engineered materials as nerve grafts has been increasing in the field of peripheral nerve injury repair, with a large number of articles published on this topic (Nagao et al., 2011). Over the last 5 years, the number of publications concerning different materials, in particular tissue-engineered materials, used for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries has tended to increase. Among the studies on this topic indexed in the Web of Science, the USA published the largest number of articles on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries, suggesting that it significantly contributes to research in this field. China produced the second most publications, and the number of publications from China increased each year. Hannover Medical School (Germany), Washington University (USA), and Nantong University (China) were the institutions that produced the largest number of publications on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries. These results point out the core institutions that have published articles on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries, which will help scientists to develop technical communications and research collaborations. The funding agencies that supported the largest number of publications on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries are the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the National Institutes of Health. China has made many significant contributions to research on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries.

The treatment of peripheral nerve injuries is a difficult medical problem. With the rapid development of science and technology, and tissue engineering in particular, the development of a graft to treat peripheral nerve injuries is promising (Chang, 2009). Such a tissue-engineered material graft will have good biocompatibility and degradation properties, making it the preferred nerve graft for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries (Mukhatyar et al., 2014; Rochkind, et al., 2014).[28]

 
  References Top

1.
Alluin O, Feron F, Desouches C, Dousset E, Pellissier JF, Magalon G, Decherchi P (2006) Metabosensitive afferent fiber responses after peripheral nerve injury and transplantation of an acellular muscle graft in association with schwann cells. J Neurotrauma 23:1883-1894.   Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Bădoiu SC, Lascăr I, Enescu DM (2014) Peripheral nerve allografting - why and how? Chirurgia (Bucur) 109:584-589.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Beigi MH, Ghasemi-Mobarakeh L, Prabhakaran MP, Karbalaie K, Azadeh H, Ramakrishna S, Baharvand H, Nasr-Esfahani MH (2014) In vivo integration of poly(å-caprolactone)/gelatin nanofibrous nerve guide seeded with teeth derived stem cells for peripheral nerve regeneration. J Biomed Mater Res A 102:4554-4567.   Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Campbell WW (2008) Evaluation and management of peripheral nerve injury. Clin Neurophysiol 119:1951-1965.   Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Chang CJ (2009) The effect of pulse-released nerve growth factor from genipin-crosslinked gelatin in schwann cell-seeded polycaprolactone conduits on large-gap peripheral nerve regeneration. Tissue Eng Part A 15:547-557.   Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
di Summa PG, Kingham PJ, Raffoul W, Wiberg M, Terenghi G, Kalbermatten DF (2010) Adipose-derived stem cells enhance peripheral nerve regeneration. J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg 63:1544-1552.   Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Heath CA, Rutkowski GE (1998) The development of bioartificial nerve grafts for peripheral-nerve regeneration. Trends Biotechnol 16:163-168.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.
Hernández-Cortés P, Toledo-Romero MA, Delgado M, Sánchez-González CE, Martin F, Galindo-Moreno P, O′Valle F (2014) Peripheral nerve reconstruction with epsilon-caprolactone conduits seeded with vasoactive intestinal peptide gene-transfected mesenchymal stem cells in a rat model. J Neural Eng 11:046024.   Back to cited text no. 8
    
9.
Jiang X, Lim SH, Mao HQ, Chew SY (2010) Current applications and future perspectives of artificial nerve conduits. Exp Neurol 223:86-101.  Back to cited text no. 9
    
10.
Kehoe S, Zhang XF, Boyd D (2012) FDA approved guidance conduits and wraps for peripheral nerve injury: a review of materials and efficacy. Injury 43:553-572.   Back to cited text no. 10
    
11.
Kim IY, Seo SJ, Moon HS, Yoo MK, Park IY, Kim BC, Cho CS (2008) Chitosan and its derivatives for tissue engineering applications. Biotechnol Adv 26:1-21.   Back to cited text no. 11
    
12.
Koudehi MF, Fooladi AA, Mansoori K, Jamalpoor Z, Amiri A, Nourani MR (2014) Preparation and evaluation of novel nano-bioglass/gelatin conduit for peripheral nerve regeneration. J Mater Sci Mater Med 25:363-373.   Back to cited text no. 12
    
13.
Kundu B, Rajkhowa R, Kundu SC, Wang X (2013) Silk fibroin biomaterials for tissue regenerations. Adv Drug Deliv Rev 65:457-470.   Back to cited text no. 13
    
14.
Leuzzi S, Armenio A, Leone L, De Santis V, Di Turi A, Annoscia P, Bufano L, Pascone M (2014) Repair of peripheral nerve with vein wrapping. G Chir 35:101-106.  Back to cited text no. 14
    
15.
Liu W, Thomopoulos S, Xia Y (2012) Electrospun nanofibers for regenerative medicine. Adv Healthc Mater 1:10-25.   Back to cited text no. 15
    
16.
Lundborg G, Dahlin L, Dohi D, Kanje M, Terada N (1997) A new type of "bioartificial" nerve graft for bridging extended defects in nerves. J Hand Surg Br 22:299-303.  Back to cited text no. 16
    
17.
Matsumoto K, Ohnishi K, Sekine T, Ueda H, Yamamoto Y, Kiyotani T, Nakamura T, Endo K, Shimizu Y (2000) Use of a newly developed artificial nerve conduit to assist peripheral nerve regeneration across a long gap in dogs. ASAIO J 46:415-420.  Back to cited text no. 17
    
18.
Mukhatyar V, Pai B, Clements I, Srinivasan A, Huber R, Mehta A, Mukhopadaya S, Rudra S, Patel G, Karumbaiah L, Bellamkonda R (2014) Molecular sequelae of topographically guided peripheral nerve repair. Ann Biomed Eng 42:1436-1455.  Back to cited text no. 18
    
19.
Nagao RJ, Lundy S, Khaing ZZ, Schmidt CE (2011) Functional characterization of optimized acellular peripheral nerve graft in a rat sciatic nerve injury model. Neurol Res 33:600-608.  Back to cited text no. 19
    
20.
Pateman CJ, Harding AJ, Glen A, Taylor CS, Christmas CR, Robinson PP, Rimmer S, Boissonade FM, Claeyssens F, Haycock JW (2015) Nerve guides manufactured from photocurable polymers to aid peripheral nerve repair. Biomaterials 49:77-89.  Back to cited text no. 20
    
21.
Peters KM, Carrico DJ, Perez-Marrero RA, Khan AU, Wooldridge LS, Davis GL, Macdiarmid SA (2010) Randomized trial of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation versus Sham efficacy in the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome: results from the SUmiT trial. J Urol 183:1438-1443.   Back to cited text no. 21
    
22.
Radtke C, Kocsis JD (2014) Olfactory-ensheathing cell transplantation for peripheral nerve repair: update on recent developments. Cells Tissues Organs 200:48-58.   Back to cited text no. 22
    
23.
Ramburrun P, Kumar P, Choonara YE, Bijukumar D, du Toit LC, Pillay V (2014) A review of bioactive release from nerve conduits as a neurotherapeutic strategy for neuronal growth in peripheral nerve injury. Biomed Res Int 2014:132350.   Back to cited text no. 23
    
24.
Rinker B, Vyas KS (2014) Clinical applications of autografts, conduits, and allografts in repair of nerve defects in the hand: current guidelines. Clin Plast Surg 41:533-550.   Back to cited text no. 24
    
25.
Rochkind S, Nevo Z (2014) Recovery of peripheral nerve with massive loss defect by tissue engineered guiding regenerative gel. Biomed Res Int 2014:327578.   Back to cited text no. 25
    
26.
Sivak WN, Bliley JM, Marra KG (2014) Polymeric biomaterials for nerve regeneration: fabrication and implantation of a biodegradable nerve guide. Methods Mol Biol 1162:139-148.   Back to cited text no. 26
    
27.
Tom VJ, Houlé JD (2011) Intraspinal microinjection of chondroitinase ABC following injury promotes axonal regeneration out of a peripheral nerve graft bridge. Exp Neurol 211:315-319.   Back to cited text no. 27
    
28.
Yue HJ, Liu SF, Liang L (2008) A bibliometric analysis on the technology innovation research in China. Keyan Guanli 5:43-52.  Back to cited text no. 28
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2], [Figure 3], [Figure 4]
 
 
    Tables

  [Table 1], [Table 2], [Table 3], [Table 4], [Table 5], [Table 6], [Table 7], [Table 8]


This article has been cited by
1 Modulation of Angiogenic Potential of Tissue-Engineered Peripheral Nerve by Covalent Incorporation of Heparin and Loading with Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor
Zhao Bin,Zhao Zhihu,Jianxiong Ma,Xinlong Ma
Neuroscience Letters. 2019;
[Pubmed] | [DOI]
2 The Evolving Neural Tissue Engineering Landscape of India
Swati Haldar,Souvik Ghosh,VINEY KUMAR,PARTHA ROY,Debrupa Lahiri
ACS Applied Bio Materials. 2019;
[Pubmed] | [DOI]
3 Early Experimental Results of Nerve Gap Bridging with Silicon Microwires
Volodymyr Likhodiievskyi
Innovative Biosystems and Bioengineering. 2019; 3(3): 168
[Pubmed] | [DOI]
4 Auto-Allo Graft Parallel Juxtaposition for Improved Neuroregeneration in Peripheral Nerve Reconstruction Based on Acellular Nerve Allografts
Filippo Boriani,Lucia Savarino,Nicola Fazio,Francesca Alice Pedrini,Milena Fini,Nicolò Nicoli Aldini,Lucia Martini,Nicoletta Zini,Marco Bernardini,Federico Bolognesi,Claudio Marchetti,Nicola Baldini
Annals of Plastic Surgery. 2019; 83(3): 318
[Pubmed] | [DOI]
5 Conductive Polymers and Hydrogels for Neural Tissue Engineering
Metin Uz,Surya K. Mallapragada
Journal of the Indian Institute of Science. 2019;
[Pubmed] | [DOI]
6 Comparing Processed Nerve Allografts and Assessing Their Capacity to Retain and Release Nerve Growth Factor
Alonda C. Pollins,Richard B. Boyer,Marlieke Nussenbaum,Wesley P. Thayer
Annals of Plastic Surgery. 2018; : 1
[Pubmed] | [DOI]
7 Electrohydrodynamic Jet 3D Printed Nerve Guide Conduits (NGCs) for Peripheral Nerve Injury Repair
Sanjairaj Vijayavenkataraman,Shuo Zhang,Siti Thaharah,Gopu Sriram,Wen Feng Lu,Jerry Ying Hsi Fuh
Polymers. 2018; 10(7): 753
[Pubmed] | [DOI]
8 Time-dependent differential expression of long non-coding RNAs following peripheral nerve injury
Bin Pan,Heng-Xing Zhou,Yi Liu,Jia-Yin Yan,Yao Wang,Xue Yao,Yan-Qiu Deng,Shu-Yi Chen,Lu Lu,Zhi-Jian Wei,Xiao-Hong Kong,Shi-Qing Feng
International Journal of Molecular Medicine. 2017; 39(6): 1381
[Pubmed] | [DOI]
9 Recent medical techniques for peripheral nerve repair: Clinico-physiological advantages of artificial nerve guidance conduits
V. F. Pyatin,A. V. Kolsanov,I. V. Shirolapov
Advances in Gerontology. 2017; 7(2): 148
[Pubmed] | [DOI]
10 Self-Targeting, Immune Transparent Plasma Protein Coated Nanocomplex for Noninvasive Photothermal Anticancer Therapy
Fwu-Long Mi,Thierry Burnouf,Shih-Yuan Lu,Yu-Jen Lu,Kun-Ying Lu,Yi-Cheng Ho,Chang-Yi Kuo,Er-Yuan Chuang
Advanced Healthcare Materials. 2017; : 1700181
[Pubmed] | [DOI]
11 Mass spectrometry comparison of nerve allograft decellularization processes
Alonda C. Pollins,Justine S. Kim,Richard B. Boyer,Wesley P. Thayer
Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine. 2017; 28(1)
[Pubmed] | [DOI]
12 Tissue-engineered nerve graft with tetramethylpyrazine for repair of sciatic nerve defects in rats
Feifan Xiang,Daiqing Wei,Yunkang Yang,Haotian Chi,Kun Yang,Yuanlin Sun
Neuroscience Letters. 2017; 638: 114
[Pubmed] | [DOI]
13 Development of Novel 3-D Printed Scaffolds With Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Nerve Regeneration
Se-Jun Lee,Wei Zhu,Lanier Heyburn,Margaret Nowicki,Brent Harris,Lijie Grace Zhang
IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering. 2017; 64(2): 408
[Pubmed] | [DOI]
14 Silk Fibroin-Based Scaffolds with Controlled Delivery Order of VEGF and BDNF for Cavernous Nerve Regeneration
Yaopeng Zhang,Jianwen Huang,Li Huang,Qiangqiang Liu,Huili Shao,Xuechao Hu,Lujie Song
ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering. 2016;
[Pubmed] | [DOI]



 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
Access Statistics
Email Alert *
Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)

 
  In this article
Abstract
Introduction
Data and Methodology
Results
Discussion
References
Article Figures
Article Tables

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1430    
    Printed5    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded416    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 14    

Recommend this journal


[TAG2]
[TAG3]
[TAG4]