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REVIEW
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 11  |  Page : 1845-1850

Normal tension glaucoma: from the brain to the eye or the inverse?


1 Department of Ophthalmology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, China
2 Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macau Institute of CNS Regeneration, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province; State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Sciences; Department of Ophthalmology, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China

Correspondence Address:
Kwok-Fai So
Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macau Institute of CNS Regeneration, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province; State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Sciences; Department of Ophthalmology, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region
China
Xue-Song Mi
Department of Ophthalmology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province
China
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Source of Support: This study was supported in part by the National Basic Research Program of China, No. 81300766 (to XSM); the Cultivation and Innovation Fund from the First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, China, No. 802168 (to XSM); the fund of Leading Talents of Guangdong Province, China, No. 87014002 (to KFS); the fund of Ningxia Key Research and Development Program (Yinchuan, Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, China), and Programme of Introducing Talents of Discipline to Universities, China, No. B14036 (to KFS), Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1673-5374.259600

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Glaucoma is a chronic, progressive optic neuropathy characterized by the loss of peripheral vision first and then central vision. Clinically, normal tension glaucoma is considered a special subtype of glaucoma, in which the patient’s intraocular pressure is within the normal range, but the patient experiences typical glaucomatous changes. However, increasing evidence has challenged the traditional pathophysiological view of normal tension glaucoma, which is based only on intraocular pressure, and breakthroughs in central nervous system imaging may now greatly increase our knowledge about the mechanisms underlying normal tension glaucoma. In this article, we review the latest progress in understanding the pathogenesis of normal tension glaucoma and in developing imaging techniques to detect it, to strengthen the appreciation for the connection between normal tension glaucoma and the brain.


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