• Users Online: 103
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
INVITED REVIEW
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 518-528

Novel applications of trophic factors, Wnt and WISP for neuronal repair and regeneration in metabolic disease


Cellular and Molecular Signaling, Newark, New Jersey 07101, USA

Correspondence Address:
Kenneth Maiese
Cellular and Molecular Signaling, Newark, New Jersey 07101
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: This research was supported by the following grants to KM: American Diabetes Association, American Heart Association, NIH NIEHS, NIH NIA, NIH NINDS, and NIH ARRA., Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1673-5374.155427

Rights and Permissions

Diabetes mellitus affects almost 350 million individuals throughout the globe resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Of further concern is the growing population of individuals that remain undiagnosed but are susceptible to the detrimental outcomes of this disorder. Diabetes mellitus leads to multiple complications in the central and peripheral nervous systems that include cognitive impairment, retinal disease, neuropsychiatric disease, cerebral ischemia, and peripheral nerve degeneration. Although multiple strategies are being considered, novel targeting of trophic factors, Wnt signaling, Wnt1 inducible signaling pathway protein 1, and stem cell tissue regeneration are considered to be exciting prospects to overcome the cellular mechanisms that lead to neuronal injury in diabetes mellitus involving oxidative stress, apoptosis, and autophagy. Pathways that involve insulin-like growth factor-1, fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and erythropoietin can govern glucose homeostasis and are intimately tied to Wnt signaling that involves Wnt1 and Wnt1 inducible signaling pathway protein 1 (CCN4) to foster control over stem cell proliferation, wound repair, cognitive decline,β-cell proliferation, vascular regeneration, and programmed cell death. Ultimately, cellular metabolism through Wnt signaling is driven by primary metabolic pathways of the mechanistic target of rapamycin and AMP activated protein kinase. These pathways offer precise biological control of cellular metabolism, but are exquisitely sensitive to the different components of Wnt signaling. As a result, unexpected clinical outcomes can ensue and therefore demand careful translation of the mechanisms that govern neural repair and regeneration in diabetes mellitus.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed3478    
    Printed20    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded825    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 23    

Recommend this journal