ORC ID , Ashraf Shamaa5, Abdel-Haleem H Elkasapy6, Noha Ibrhim7, Azza Elamir8">
  • Users Online: 267
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
RESEARCH ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 12  |  Page : 2050-2058

Does vitamin C have the ability to augment the therapeutic effect of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells on spinal cord injury?


1 Department of Histology and Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Banha University, Banha, Egypt
2 Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, Banha University, Banha, Egypt
3 Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Banha University, Banha, Egypt
4 Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt
5 Department of Surgery and Radiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt
6 Department of Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Banha University, Banha, Egypt
7 Department of Medical Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Banha University, Banha, Egypt
8 Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, El Fayoum University, Egyptian, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Dina Sabry
Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Giza
Egypt
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: This work was funded by Project Management Unit, Banha University, Banha, Egypt., Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1673-5374.221163

Rights and Permissions

Methylprednisolone (MP) is currently the only drug confirmed to exhibit a neuroprotective effect on acute spinal cord injury (SCI). Vitamin C (VC) is a natural water-soluble antioxidant that exerts neuroprotective effects through eliminating free radical damage to nerve cells. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs), as multipotent stem cells, are promising candidates in SCI repair. To evaluate the therapeutic effects of MP, VC and BMMSCs on traumatic SCI, 80 adult male rats were randomly divided into seven groups: control, SCI (SCI induction by weight-drop method), MP (SCI induction, followed by administration of 30 mg/kg MP via the tail vein, once every other 6 hours, for five times), VC (SCI induction, followed by intraperitoneal administration of 100 mg/kg VC once a day, for 28 days), MP + VC (SCI induction, followed by administration of MP and VC as the former), BMMSCs (SCI induction, followed by injection of 3 × 106 BMMSCs at the injury site), and BMMSCs + VC (SCI induction, followed by BMMSCs injection and VC administration as the former). Locomotor recovery was assessed using the Basso Mouse Scale. Injured spinal cord tissue was evaluated using hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemical staining. Expression of transforming growth factor-beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 genes was determined using real-time quantitative PCR. BMMSCs intervention better promoted recovery of nerve function of rats with SCI, mitigated nerve cell damage, and decreased expression of transforming growth factor-beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 genes than MP and/or VC. More importantly, BMMSCs in combination with VC induced more obvious improvements. These results suggest that VC can enhance the neuroprotective effects of BMMSCs against SCI.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1913    
    Printed13    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded258    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 3    

Recommend this journal