ORC ID , Márton Balogh1, Ádám J Tengölics1, Alma Ganczer1, Béla Völgyi2 ORC ID , Tamás Kovács-Öller PhD 3 ORC ID ">
  • Users Online: 1005
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
REVIEW
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 10  |  Page : 1911-1920

The role of gap junctions in cell death and neuromodulation in the retina


1 János Szentágothai Research Centre, University of Pécs, Pécs; Retinal Electrical Synapses Research Group, National Brain Research Program (NAP 2.0), Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest; Department of Experimental Zoology and Neurobiology, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary
2 János Szentágothai Research Centre, University of Pécs, Pécs; Retinal Electrical Synapses Research Group, National Brain Research Program (NAP 2.0), Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest; Department of Experimental Zoology and Neurobiology; Medical School, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary
3 János Szentágothai Research Centre, University of Pécs, Pécs; Retinal Electrical Synapses Research Group, National Brain Research Program (NAP 2.0), Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest; Medical School, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary

Correspondence Address:
Tamás Kovács-Öller
János Szentágothai Research Centre, University of Pécs, Pécs; Retinal Electrical Synapses Research Group, National Brain Research Program (NAP 2.0), Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest; Medical School, University of Pécs, Pécs
Hungary
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: This work was supported by the Hungarian Brain Research Program 2 (2017-1.2.1.-NKP-2017) (to BV), by the NKFI (OTKA NN128293) from the European Union and the State of Hungary, co-financed by the European Social Fund in the framework of TAMOP-4.2.4.A/2-11/1-2012-0001 National Excellence Program (to BV) and by the ÚNKP-20-3-I-PTE-472 New National Excellence Program of the Ministry for Innovation and Technology (to GS), Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1673-5374.308069

Rights and Permissions

Vision altering diseases, such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, myopia, retinal vascular disease, traumatic brain injuries and others cripple many lives and are projected to continue to cause anguish in the foreseeable future. Gap junctions serve as an emerging target for neuromodulation and possible regeneration as they directly connect healthy and/or diseased cells, thereby playing a crucial role in pathophysiology. Since they are permeable for macromolecules, able to cross the cellular barriers, they show duality in illness as a cause and as a therapeutic target. In this review, we take recent advancements in gap junction neuromodulation (pharmacological blockade, gene therapy, electrical and light stimulation) into account, to show the gap junction’s role in neuronal cell death and the possible routes of rescuing neuronal and glial cells in the retina succeeding illness or injury.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed976    
    Printed4    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded112    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal